Use Case Refresher

first_imgAMT Usage Models for 2006 — vPro Expert CenterRemote Asset InventoryotThe IT management console is able to “see” all PCs physically connected to the network, regardless of their power state.otCount your networked PCs even whenpowered down or the OS is inoperableotFaster, more accurate than manual auditsotAssist compliance with government regulations
Hardware and Software InventoryotAccurately inventory hardware and software assetsotThird-party software can now store hardware and software asset information in tamper-resistant, nonvolatile memory on vPro™ technology-based PCs, where it can be securely accessed by authorized staff from the IT console. otRemote hardware inventories assist with upgrade planningor lifecycle managementotSave money on license fees with accurate software inventories
Remote Diagnostics and RepairotDiagnose, reboot, and repair PCs down-the-wireotPC unable to boot –> PC sends an alert –> PC remotely rebooted from standard image on management server –> Technician diagnoses problem and repairs issue as appropriate (remote SW update, local HW install)otReduce the number of deskside visits otRapid response gets users up and running quickly
Agent Presence CheckingotAn agent by definition is a complex software entity capable of acting with a certain degree of intelligence and autonomy in order to accomplish specific tasks or support the tasks of other software entities.]otKeep agents operating correctlyotManagement or security agent is continuously checking in with Intel vPro technology –> Management agent fails to check in –> PC alerts IT console that management agent is missing or non-functioning –> IT management console repairs non-working management agentotManagement agents in place ensure more accurate PC asset inventory
Encrypted, Remote Power-On and UpdateotPush security updates to PCs even if they are powered offotIT Management Console reviews agent software report in management database for client DAT version to identify clients requiring update –> Unique encrypted power-on command issued by IT console –> Virus DAT file on PC updated and rebooted if necessary –> Encrypted power-off command sent to PCotEncrypted, remote deployment of patches without user interruptionotReduce time required to deploy patches, reduces vulnerability
Hardware-Based Isolation and RecoveryotFilter harmful viruses and isolate infected PCs otHardware filters add a new level of security to your PC fleetotIsolation helps prevent infected PCs from spreading viruses
PCs with Proactive Security — Agent Presence CheckingotKeep agents operating correctlyotSecurity agents in place reduce IT vulnerability otManagement or security agent is continuously checking in with Intel vPro technology –> Security agent fails to check in –> PC alerts IT console that security agent is missing or non-functioning –> IT management console repairs non-working security agent
Increased Energy Efficiency — Innovative Services and Initiatives otSave valuable energy with the use of energy management policy software and Intel® vPro™ processor technologyotIT console sets Energy Management Policy with agent –> System powered down when inactive, based on policy –> System can be reliably activated for maintenance via secure management channel –> Energy Management agent protected via agent presence monitorotEnterprise policy centrally managed & tamper resistantotAgent can report energy usage and savings back to console read more

IT Can’t Lead Corporate Sustainability Efforts but Sure Can Help

first_imgFor us inside Intel IT, it is now clearer to me why Intel IT maintains an IT Sustainability Program that supports Intel’s Corporate Sustainability initiative.   “Why should an IT manager or CIO bombarded with a 1,000 other things to think/worry about, care about sustainability?  How will it help them advance their careers or bring more IT value to the business.” So while IT Sustainability may not be your most important IT or CIO priority, investing with an eye toward this topic is wise and is likely aligned with many other priorities you and your peers are already doing.  The three reasons listed above are prudent IT operational activities and doing them represent best IT practices that have a solid impact on creating business value. Not doing them could actually have detrimental impacts to an IT career. Intel IT’s recent data center strategy identified that not only is proactive server refresh the biggest driver of financial value but also in the reduction of IT’s CO2 footprint. Another area where our business strategy benefited IT Sustainability was in our transition from a desktop driven PC fleet to a mobile PC fleet that boosted employee productivity while employing more energy efficient solutions. However, IT sustainability also help serve as an example for corporate responsibility building brand, influence product purchase with an increased focus on energy efficiency and influence the improvement of business processes with a mind toward efficiency and elimination of redundancy and waste.  Gartner’s Top 10 list reinforces these sentiments where they identify that “IT can enable many green initiatives. The use of IT, particularly among the white collar staff, can greatly enhance an enterprise’s green credentials. Common green initiatives include the use of e-documents, reducing travel and teleworking. IT can also provide the analytic tools that others in the enterprise may use to reduce energy consumption in the transportation of goods or other carbon management activities.” Green IT initiatives can also reduce operational costs. I recently learned about the broad video conferencing capabilities that Intel IT has enabled to help employees collaborate across time zones and countries.  This capability has encouraged less travel for routine purposes avoiding unnecessary travel expense for employees delivering a dramatic multi-million dollar savings impact this current year. Intel IT’s proof of concept efforts in data center cooling innovation earned us recognition as one of the 2009 Green 15 by Infoworld.com.  Together with Intel’s business leaders, our operational and investment efforts have helped Intel achieve a top 5 ranking as a green company by Newsweek. Green IT initiatives can impact ROI and Profitability. In addition to the benefits of electricity savings, the proper application of technology (like proactive server refresh, facility re-use) can affect land use, avoidance of new construction, boost asset utilization … all of which assist in improving corporate sustainability. The answers I got from her plus a recent listing from Gartner of “IT for Green” as Number 4 on a Top 10 Strategic Technologies for 2010, helped shape my thinking and the title for this blog. Keep the Business Running/Legal.  As an ongoing activity, IT must always look at industry and regulatory trends to proactively plan for an ever-changing compliance landscape.  Many European Union countries and the US Environmental Protection Agency are creating regulations that affect the application of information technology. I’ve been hearing about green IT for a while now and personally thought it was a lot more hype than true business value creation.   I was surprised coming over to the IT side to see a good deal of focus being applied to Sustainability.  A couple months ago, I asked a peer of mine working on Intel IT sustainability a simple, yet challenging question. Learn more about Intel IT’s lessons learned and best practices here. Chris (twitter)last_img read more

Intel® Anti-Theft Technology: Protecting Sensitive Information for KMVS

first_imgKMVS is a legal firm, based in Prague,Czech Republic,specializing in copyright and intellectual property law; personal data protection; and commercial, employment, and contract law. Personal data protection is especially important, since employees often need to transport confidential client information on their laptops. KMVS needed to secure this information to prevent unauthorized access—a need that became even more urgent when one of the company’s partners lost a laptop with sensitive client information.KMVS purchased Lenovo T510 ThinkPad* laptops powered by the Intel® Core™ i7 vPro™ processor with Intel® Anti-Theft Technology (Intel® AT). Now if an employee’s laptop is lost or stolen, KMVS can remotely disable it by sending a ‘poison pill’ through its standard Internet connection or via its integrated 3G receiver—rendering the laptop useless and ensuring the information it contains is secure. This can also be triggered if the laptop fails to check in with the central server or if it registers too many failed log-in attempts. If the company later recovers the laptop, it can quickly reactivate it with no damage to hardware or software.“Intel Anti-Theft Technology helps us ensure that the sensitive client information stored on our laptops can only be accessed by those authorized to do so, even in the event of a theft or loss of a laptop,” explained Libor Štajer, a lawyer for KMVS.For the whole story, read our new KMVS business success story. As always, you can find this one, and many others, in the Intel.com Reference Room and IT Center.*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.last_img read more

Beta CIRA support in the Intel vPro PowerShell module

first_imgFinally add your connected CIRA clients using the manage-MPSCLient script:manage-MPSClient.ps1 -hostname vproClient1 -action ADDmanage-MPSClient.ps1 -hostname vproClient2 -action ADDmanage-MPSClient.ps1 -hostname vproClient3 -action ADD Now call any Intel vPro PowerShell script.Important notes -The MPS information is on a per session basis,So each time a PowerShell console is opened, the MPS information must be set.The MPS information is only available to scripts called in that console.Your feedback is welcome! I am planning on adding native CIRA support into the next Intel vPro Module release. Next add the conenction  information for your mps proxy. In my environment the proxy is mps.vprodemo.com. I will add both the http and socks proxy info.center_img Beta CIRA support has been added to the 3.1 version of the Intel vPro PowerShell module. All of the Powershell cmdlets transparently communicate to the CIRA connected client through an MPS. First the CIRA proxy and client list must be registered with the Intel vPro PowerShell module. Afterwards, just call your normal scripts.I did not include native scripts to perform this fucntionality since I are planning that for the next release. Threfore we need some way to test that CIRA works and to explore the usage. To do this I wrote some test scripts and attached them to this blog. The next release of the Intel vPro module will include native CIRA support.I have three scripts:get-MPSStatus.ps1set-MPS.ps1manage-MPSClient.ps1First, lets ensure that no proxy is setup: Typeget-MPSStatuslast_img read more

2 in 1 Devices Cut IT Costs

first_imgAs the workforce becomes more mobile, many companies are considering tablet devices for departments like Marketing and Sales in order to make completing tasks easier while on the go. Though tablets can be beneficial in several circumstances, IT should first look to new 2 in 1 machines, instead of purchasing and managing both a laptop and a tablet for each employee.-IT Peer Network AdministratorIn order to determine potential savings, Prowess Consulting analyzed three-year costs for an organization that plans to purchase two devices for each staff member: a sub $1,000 laptop and either an Apple iPad Air or an Android (Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1) consumer tablet. In our scenario, both the laptop and the tablet would be managed, secured, and supported by IT, even in a BYOD scenario. Then, they compared those three-year costs against purchasing and managing an Intel vPro 2 in 1 HP EliteBook Revolve 810 G2 for each employee.Though initial hardware costs might assumed to be higher for IT departments purchasing two devices instead of one, the HP EliteBook Revolve 810 G2 device cost about the same as the combined hardware cost of the laptop device and either consumer tablet. Similarly, the price of software across the different scenarios was considered to be roughly equal.The cost advantages of the HP EliteBook Revolve 810 G2 became obvious when they added in the costs of the hardware support, replacements, and most important — the costs to deploy, manage, secure, and support. (The savings would become even more dramatic if you factored in the costs associated with additional peripheral devices and accessories, and the time employees must spend managing files and content, however, these were omitted from the analysis.)With both employer-purchased and BYOD devices, the organization and workers benefit with the Intel vPro 2 in 1 solution because such devices have the built-in remote manageability and security features of the 4th generation Intel Core vPro processor and enterprise-grade manageability features available with Windows 8.1 Pro.For example, faster hardware-based data encryption can secure information without slowing down work, and two-factor authentication with Intel Identity Protection Technology (Intel IPT) can help prevent unauthorized access to devices and business data. Plus, IT can configure, diagnose, isolate, and repair an unresponsive infected PC using remote support and monitoring capabilities embedded into select Intel vPro processors.The analysis shows that the associate costs of support, management, and security nearly doubled in the scenario of IT having to deploy two devices per employee instead of one. Simply put, the management of devices doesn’t scale.Aside from lower IT management costs, users can enjoy a better work experience with the Intel vPro 2 in 1 because it can run full-featured Microsoft Office and other applications, which workers rely on, in tablet mode. iPad and Android tablets do not support these applications natively and offer less capable alternatives. Additionally, iPad and Android tablets do not match the browsing functionality or multi-tasking capabilities of Windows tablets, restricting Web-based productivity or the many tasks that require switching back and forth among multiple applications.Therefore, instead of purchasing both a traditional laptop and a tablet device, a single HP EliteBook Revolve 810 G2 would be a less expensive and more secure alternative for the organization and provide a better laptop plus tablet experience for users.To read the longer analysis comparing the two device scenarios, read the Total Cost of Ownership white paper and for more information on the total cost of ownership, check out the latest video and infographic that highlight how much a business can save when it switches to a 2 in 1 device.Are you weighing new device options? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment below telling us the different factors that influence your decision-making. And join the social conversation on Twitter by using the hashtags: #ITCenter and #2in1last_img read more

Spark an idea with the Internet of (School) Things

first_imgWhen it comes to technology buzzwords, there are fewer that get thrown around more than the Internet of Things, or IoT for short. Interestingly, this is one area of innovation where young people may actually be behind the curve – at least in theory. Many of the students we speak to couldn’t tell you what the Internet of Things means, but they’re more than familiar with it in practice.Experts predict that there are now 15 billion devices (“things”) connected to the internet – hence the name. And around one-third of these will be autonomous embedded systems. This could be anything from a thermometer measuring the temperature of a house or a sensor to detect if a parking space is occupied to an intelligent beer keg or Prof. Stephen Hawking’s wheelchair.We’ve invested a lot into IoT, because it simply is the future of technology for our species. And we want to spread that message, which is why we’re behind the Internet of School Things, along with our partners in the DISTANCE project. The project (which you can get involved with) aims to transform the way students learn about our world. We worked with teachers and learners from eight schools to develop a whole programme of materials – from kit to lesson plans – to help you get started. The content is designed for a range of subjects across Key Stages 2, 3 and 4. Once the plug and play devices have been set up, students can explore their live data and conduct experiments on this website. They are also able to interact with other schools’ networked devices, such as our array of Weather Stations across the UK.But we want this type of learning to be the start for IoT in education. Imagine a school environment where connected devices talk to each other, passing information that makes education easier, more engaging and more successful. Imagine a visually impaired student being able to sit down at any computer and that computer automatically recognise them, and enlarge font sizes. Imagine a classroom that detects students as they walk in, and pushes a warm-up exercise to their tablet. No more register, no more struggling to get their attention at 9am every day. What about data-driven feedback on how students are coping with tasks neurologically? Neurosensors could tell teachers in real time how much cognitive energy students are spending on a task, so teachers know who’s really struggling. OK, so the last one might be a bit Star Trek right now, but the possibilities are mind-blowing.This could spell an end to the traditional teacher/learner relationship. Giving machines this much control in what has always been a very human environment sounds scary, but it needn’t be. By shifting some of the classroom management to the Internet of Things, the teacher is free to concentrate on tailoring the education they provide. Improved intelligence from data analytics, could take so much of the guesswork out of lesson and curriculum planning.What are your thoughts on IoT? We’d love to hear your feedback. Let us know in the comments below, or via our Twitter or Facebook page.Stay in touch: Join the Intel Education communityDiscover more: Learn how Intel is powering innovation in educationlast_img read more

Customer Loyalty, Data-Driven Style

first_imgWith more customer data available than ever before, the challenge is no longer getting customers to opt-in to email newsletters. Rather, businesses must collect all that shopping data  — and take smart action in response.Body Energy Club is a company based in Vancouver, British Columbia. This retailer of health products and smoothies wanted to expand its offerings to capture a slice of the competitive American market, and utilized a data-driven customer loyalty program to gain and keep customers.A New Loyalty Program for a New MarketAlthough the company is well-known in Canada, Body Energy Club knew it would need a different approach to adapt and expand across the border.“While we’ve been around in Vancouver for 14 years and everyone knows me, nobody knows us in California, and I don’t want to wait 14 years to build it up like I did in Vancouver. I wanted to speed things up and turn a profit within the first year,” says founder Dominick Tousignant.Body Energy Club decided to implement a new customer loyalty program. After all, repeat customers spend 67 percent more on purchases than new customers do. Three priorities topped the list of requirements for the new program:●    Cloud-based: With brick-and-mortar locations across North America, the program needed to pull and analyze data in real time.●      Scalable: Body Energy Club was new to the U.S. market, but wanted to start strong and grow quickly.●      Reliable: The company needed a complete solution that didn’t require much expertise to maintain.Tousignant chose Thirdshelf, a developer of cloud-based, scalable customer loyalty platforms. Thirdshelf’s solution runs on an Intel Xeon E5 v3 processor, which is designed for architecting next-generation data centers. Its software-defined infrastructure is made for efficiency, performance, and agile delivery across both cloud-based and traditional applications. The processor was the perfect choice for the high-performance computing, networking, and storage that Thirdshelf required to drive the platform Body Energy Club would need to grow.How It Works: Using Data to Drive RelationshipsThirdshelf’s platform integrated with Body Energy Club’s POS system to capture purchases. The loyalty program then used that purchase data to develop sophisticated marketing campaigns to keep new customers coming back  — and keep returning customers engaged.Based on the Google Cloud Platform, the loyalty program scaled easily as Body Energy Club’s new customer base grew and the collected data grew exponentially.The Intel Xeon-powered platform quickly analyzed large datasets to find trends. This data was used to create personalized offers that Body Energy Club knew its customers would appreciate — which in turn drove customer retention. In fact, the redemption rate of its promotions rose to 16 percent. The industry average is 0.13 percent.Customer Loyalty: Not Just for Big BusinessHistorically, only big businesses had the budgets and technical teams to properly collect and analyze growing piles of customer data.With Intel and Thirdshelf’s cloud-based solution, Body Energy Club was able to focus on its product selection and customer service, rather than worrying about technical issues and updates.What’s New — and What’s NotBody Energy Club’s story isn’t uncommon. What’s new is the ability of small businesses to use customer data to drive sales in ways that were previously only available with big business budgets.Just eight months after its U.S. launch, Body Energy Club’s integrated rewards program saw sales growth of 400 percent per day. And the open rate for email offers rose to 85 percent, well over the industry average of 18 percent.Thirdshelf is growing, too. “The realities and the transaction levels for different kinds of retail stores are different, so the way you engage your customers needs to be different, too,” says CTO Antoine Azar. The company is currently working on industry-specific vertical marketing solutions.We invite you to learn more about Intel’s IT solutions for small business. You can also join and continue the conversation on Twitter.last_img read more

Kiosk and Vending Solutions Shift Retail’s Promise

first_imgThe humble vending machine has long been a staple of grocery stores, offices, schools, and airports. Now, it’s getting a major technology upgrade, enhancing its utility and service possibilities for both customers and businesses. Powered by Intel technology, smart vending provides new experiences that challenge what it means to do business in an IoT-enabled landscape.Online Shopping Inside the StoreFor many retailers, there’s often too much inventory to display on the store floor, and doing so exposes merchandise to risks, like shrinkage. That’s where smart kiosks can save the day.With smart kiosks, you enable your store to display the entirety of your inventoryOpens in a new window in a fast, accessible manner. If a customer wants to take a look inside a product or see it in different colors, it’s totally possible without the risk of displaying all that inventory. From tablets to 55-inch touch displays, there are near endless possibilities for displaying your products.The Next Generation of Digital SignageDigital signage can be about more than a flashy billboardOpens in a new window. When creativity meets Intel technology, the possibilities are endless. Digital signage can double as a kiosk, playing commercials and offering customers free beveragesOpens in a new window as a reward for their loyalty to your products.A digital sign facilitates a hangout space for customers in the store, furthering your brand’s recognition, and offering power outlets, product-themed experiences, or games via the attached kiosk customers engage with.IoT-Enabled Customer ExperienceGetting customers what they want when they want it can be a challenge. Luckily, IoT-enabled technologies are on the case, working to make connecting businesses with customers via the products they want a frictionless experience.Eighty-one percent of customers go online for their shopping information, but 90 percent of sales still take place in stores. Companies like Moki partner with IntelOpens in a new window to bridge the gap between the physical and digital realms, working to create a store that represents the promise of unified commerce and the omnichannel experience.Using customer-facing devices like digital kiosks and rugged tablets, retailers can give customers a greater degree of control and satisfaction over the customer experience. Kiosks can also serve as mobile point-of-sale (POS) systems that allow for quicker and more responsive sales.If you’re intrigued by the possibilities vending and kiosks have to offer, head over to our solutions page to find out moreOpens in a new window, and see what the future of retail has in store for you.last_img read more

It’s a Store, it’s a Distribution Center, it’s a Community Center!

first_imgLet’s continue the conversation about the store of the tomorrow. Which we must be planning and implementing today.About ten minutes away and down the hill is a retail site in the midst of transformation.It’s at the intersection of two major high-traffic urban thoroughfares. Reasonable parking in front. With a tasty catchment area of hipster Millennials in nearby apartments and X- and boomer professionals in single-family dwellings.At one time, it was the local—and successful—muffler and brakes automobile repair shop. Then shuttered. Then abandoned to graffiti and broken windows.And now to be a combination laundromat, coffee shop, and performance area.  All in one. Seeing this come together got me thinking about the purpose of tomorrow’s store, and indeed, the opportunities for a retail brand to create profitable shopper affinity. The I-choose-this brand-without-thinking type of affinity that pays off in ever-higher shares of wallet and fatter margins.There are a lot of variables that go into creating such affinity.But one—and one that is perhaps far more important than any of us assume—is that of the shopper feeling part of a community. One that comes together in shared interests and shared values.We’re in an era that is ripe for new community creation. As researchers and authors have pointed out for the past twenty years, membership and participation in existing professional and civic organizations—from unions to churches to parent-teacher associations to fraternal organizations to adult athletic leagues—is in a steady decline.And not only in the U.S. Relatively recent (2016) research published in The Guardian showed a similar decline in the UK.Which—given the social nature of humans—suggests not a lack of interest in community. Just that old forms of community are increasingly irrelevant.Which leads us to the opportunity in retail. And for retail stores.What are retail stores but the physical merchandising of shared interests and values?Shared interests in cooking, which drive housewares and kitchen remodeling businesses. Shared interests in video gaming, which drive not only the sale of games and subscriptions but upper-end personal computers. Shared interests in fashion and design. Shared interests in healthy living and weight loss. Shared interests in happy children, and clean, well-organized homes.The re-imagined space ten minutes away and down the hill is about to offer a gathering space for those who share interests in good coffee, live music, and new friendships – all while the washing machines spin and the dryers tumble.Perhaps in today’s ideation about the stores of tomorrow, we need to be thinking about merchandising not only SKU’s but community.Let me know what you think.#IamIntel.last_img read more

Plan Your IBM Think Schedule to Learn about AI, Cloud, and Security

first_imgIBM Think 2019 hits San Francisco next week, from February 12-15, bringing together some 40,000 of technology’s top innovators, leaders, and thinkers at the Moscone Convention Center. IBM Think is Big Blue’s premier partner and customer conference, a forum where business executives and technology professionals come together to understand how the latest cloud, AI, data, IT, analytics, and security solutions can help your organization outpace the competition and build a more strategic technology roadmap into the future.IBM Think is also an important show for Intel, as IBM and Intel work together closely to drive innovation for enterprise cloud solutions, particularly for compute-intensive workloads such as artificial intelligence (AI) and high performance computing (HPC). Intel® technologies, such as Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors, Intel® Xeon® E processors, Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory, and Intel® Software Guard Extensions (Intel® SGX) are the foundation of the IBM* Cloud and the on-premise IBM* Cloud Private, bringing increased performance and security to powerful and flexible cloud environments. To learn more about optimizing HPC workloads for the IBM Cloud with @IBMCloud Director on Intel® architecture, listen to this podcast from @TechAllyson.If you can’t make it in person to IBM Think, you can still follow all the show’s excitement and announcements on Twitter. For show highlights and news of the latest co-innovation between Intel and IBM in cloud, AI, and HPC technologies, follow:Jeff Wittich, @jwittich, Raejeanne Skellern, @RaejeanneSTim Allen, @TimIntelAttend IBM Think keynote session  with Intel’s VP of the Cloud Platform Group, Raejeanne Skillern, on Wednesday, Feb 13th and follow her on Twitter @RaejeanneS.Don’t Miss These Breakout SessionsIntel has lined up some exciting and thought provoking breakout sessions for IBM Think 2019, so be sure to put these on your schedule to learn more about the two companies’ joint innovation in enterprise data center and cloud optimization solutions.Tuesday, Feb. 12Getting Started on the IBM Cloud: The Latest Technologies from IBM Cloud Compute and Intel (8:30am-9:10am, Moscone South, Level 2 San Francisco Ballroom 205). Dustin McNab (IBM), Jamie Sumner (Intel), Norman Lim (Intel).Wednesday, Feb. 13High Performance Computing on IBM Cloud in Financial Services(12:30pm-1:10pm, Moscone South, Level 2 San Francisco Ballroom 205). Learn how financial services firms have leveraged HPC on IBM Cloud. This discussion with Neil Cowit and Keri Olson from IBM will cover cost/benefit and business impacts of the joint Intel/IBM Cloud HPC solution.Revving Up Data Ingestion for Autonomous Vehicles (1:30am–2:10pm, Hilton Union Square, Ballroom Level, Franciscan A). Darren Pulsipher, an enterprise solution architect in Intel’s Data Center Group, and John Williams, a business development manager at Intel, explain that one of the primary challenges of autonomous driving is how to effectively receive, manage, and mine vast quantities of data to help insure safe driving outcomes. Learn how Intel and Red Hat have been working jointly in the areas of storage and memory to deliver a strong foundation—based on Red Hat* Enterprise Linux 7.6 supporting Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory and Intel® Optane™ DC SSDs—to meet these challenges.Simplifying Enterprise Workloads with Modern Cloud Infrastructure (3:30pm- 4:10pm, Moscone South, Exhibit Level, Hall C, Cloud & Infrastructure Theater F). Current and emerging technologies for infrastructure design continue to blend and play critical roles for businesses operating across the entire cloud platform. Industry pipelines for larger-than-life workloads focus on driving innovation across the stack with a unified architecture, as workflows demand more interactivity. Learn how IBM Cloud Infrastructure is evolving and driving next-generation capabilities at this discussion with Intel’s VP and General Manager of Intel’s Cloud Service Provider business Raejeanne Skillern, Yi Wang of Tencent Cloud, and Matthew Prince of Cloudflare. These leaders in the field of internet-based technology for media and entertainment reveal first-hand how rising compute, storage and networking trends shape IT moves across the cloud.Transform Your Analytics with IBM* Data Virtualization (3:30pm-4:10pm, Moscone South Level 3, Room 303). Join IBM’s Sam Lightstone and Intel’s Chief Data Scientist Melvin Greer for a discussion of IBM’s new virtualization technology, which provides a virtual data platform to centralize and access data across geographies, multiple major database platforms, and private and public clouds. IBM Data Virtualization helps eliminate data silos and brings data closer to the business for faster, more actionable insights.Breaking Through Barriers with High Performance Computing (5:30pm-6:10pm, Moscone South, Exhibit Level, Hall C, Cloud and Infrastructure Theater G). Using the cloud to infinitely scale out your computations is game-changing, but it presents its own set of challenges at enterprise scale. Bill Magro, Intel Fellow and Intel’s Chief Technologist for High Performance Computing (HPC), leads this panel discussion with executives from IBM and Rescale to explain how to leverage IBM Cloud for various HPC workloads, along with deployment examples and best practices for choosing the right software and infrastructure environment for HPC workloads.Thursday, Feb. 14Harnessing the Power of IBM Cloud for High Performance Computing (11:30am -12:10pm, Moscone South, Level 2, San Francisco Ballroom 205). Keri Olson from IBM joins Raghu Moorthy, a director in Intel’s Software Group, and Bob Burroughs, director of Technical Computing Ecosystem Enabling for Intel, to discuss how HPC offerings available on IBM Cloud can accelerate HPC deployment by offering a simplified, purpose-built portal with intuitive workflows. Join this joint IBM/Intel session to learn how HPC-as-a-Service and HPC Cluster on IBM Cloud address specific use cases by highlighting real customer deployment examples and best practices.Infrastructure Matters: Benefits of Moving to the IBM Cloud with VMWare (1:00pm-1:20pm, Moscone South, Exhibit Level, Hall C, Business Partner Showcase Theater). Intel’s Gene Quaglia and Dale Hoffman from IBM discuss how to migrate to the cloud with confidence while maximizing your investment with workload placement on secure, high-performing and fine-tuned software and hardware from industry leaders—IBM, VMware and Intel.Supercharge IBM* DB2 with Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory (3:30pm-4:10pm, Moscone South, Level 2, San Francisco Ballroom 215). Matthew Emmerton from IBM and Jantz Tran, an Intel Software Performance Engineer, discuss how Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory can alleviate performance bottlenecks for DB2 operations in e-commerce applications requiring analytics and high-speed transaction processing in real-time. The session shows how Intel and IBM have worked together to revamp DB2 for Intel’s persistent memory technology, and presents the performance benefits from capitalizing on Intel’s new persistent memory technologies.Intel executives will also take part in a series of lightning round sessions where industry experts share their insights in brief TED-style presentations with Q&As on variety of technical topics, including the benefits of moving to the IBM cloud with VMWare, IBM, and Intel; and Intel® Optane™ persistent memory advantages in the IBM Cloud. Join Us for Fun and Learning at the Intel BoothIntel booth #410 will also be a busy place. We are hosting five demos within the booth throughout each day on topics that highlight Intel’s co-engineering innovation with IBM and other key partners. Stop by to learn more about the following topics:IBM Cloud HPC Solutions: Learn the value of HPCaaS and the HPC cluster on IBM Cloud, powered by Intel.IBM Cloud Private on Dell* EMC VxRail: Migrate from AWS to ICP on Dell EMC VxRail and Intel® Xeon® architecture to get the power and ease-of-use of hyper converged infrastructure in the cloud.Get More VMs from VMware* vSAN with Intel Optane DC SSDs: Transform your infrastructure with VMware vSAN on Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors and Intel® Optane™ SSDs, with simplified deployment using the Intel® Select Solution for vSAN.IBM Cloud Private with Lenovo: Lenovo has worked closely with IBM and Intel to develop infrastructure solutions for IBM Cloud Private, including an IBM appliance that supports IBM Cloud Private and runs on Lenovo* ThinkSystem hardware. Lenovo has also developed reference architectures to optimize performance and scalability of applications like IBM Db2 on IBM Cloud Private.SAP* HANA Workloads on IBM: Process more data faster, increase performance for quicker insights, and retain data even without power with SAP HANA operating on Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory in the IBM Cloud.Intel will also sponsor a series of Tech Talks at the Intel booth #410, where we’ll host half-hour discussions featuring a number of Intel partners, including VMware, SAP, Red Hat, Cloud Physics, and of course IBM. You’ll have a chance to hear about the latest partner solutions from the wide IBM-Intel ecosystem.Attending events at the Intel booth also gives you a chance to win prizes. Pick up a Passport Program form, collect three activity stamps by attending at least three demos or Tech Talks at the Intel booth, and return your stamped passport to the Intel booth. You’ll be registered for a drawing to win a free Intel® NUC PC. A drawing takes place at the end of each day, Tuesday through Thursday, and 11:45am on Friday. Must be present to win. See Passport Program form for complete details.We are excited to attend IBM Think 2019, and hope to see you there. Stop by the Intel booth #410 to say hello. Or catch us on Twitter!last_img read more

We’re Stepping on the Gas Pedal for Hybrid Cloud

first_imgEarlier this year, Google Cloud announced its vision for hybrid cloud centered on providing a choice of running workloads within GCP or on-prem with seamless workload portability. At Intel, we have long believed that cloud architectures are a foundation for data-centric computing and that a multi-cloud foundation is required to fully unleash the power of data for business growth. This is why we were delighted to join Google Cloud to announce a strategic collaboration to deliver an infrastructure foundation to fuel hybrid cloud deployments, a market opportunity estimated to be > $45B in 2019 growing at 17% CAGR.The foundation for this collaboration is the delivery of an infrastructure reference design that offers a pre-verified configuration that takes advantage of the recently introduced 2nd Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable processor, available in Google Cloud instances, and software optimizations across the solution stack. We’ll offer this reference design to developers, and work with industry leaders to deliver it to market as an Intel® Select Solution later this year.This collaboration also reflects our long-term Technology Alliance that is rooted in driving technology innovation and business acceleration with value for customers out of hardware, software and services and takes advantage of our deep joint work in optimizing Kubernetes to take full advantage of Xeon processor capabilities.The announcement of this collaboration couldn’t come at a better time. One week on the heels of the first data centric launch in Intel’s history, the time is ripe for customers to modernize data center infrastructure. With an estimated 9 million servers approaching five year lifespan in data centers across the globe, enterprises face an incredible opportunity to drive increased efficiency and organizational productivity through infrastructure modernization efforts that embrace both on-prem refresh and cloud service integration.last_img read more

Acquittals in CJD Trial Divide French Scientists

first_imgPARIS–Few criminal investigations go on so long that one of the accused dies of old age, and fewer draw upon the opinions of someone soon to win a Nobel Prize, but a court case in which both happened ended here today. Three French judges rejected charges of involuntary homicide and aggravated fraud against six doctors and pharmacists, which may end a stunningly prolonged investigation centering on the distribution of human growth hormone apparently contaminated with deadly prions.The hormone had been isolated from cadavers, and much of the trial centered on whether appropriate purification standards were used, an issue that resulted in several prominent scientists being called to the witness stand. The Pasteur Institute, located here, which was involved in purifying the hormone, had already been fined by a civil court that held it responsible for the contamination, but whether someone had done anything criminal remained an open matter. 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(Science’s original stories from the early 1990s are available here and here.) So far, 117 of the youngsters have died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the human form of mad cow disease, and three more have recently shown symptoms.For virologist Luc Montagnier, a witness in the trial and a winner of this year’s Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, the ruling arouses concern. “I fear we may have not learned any lessons from this case and will face other and bigger public health scandals in the absence of adequate scientific and medical caution over the effects of new treatments on young people and future generations,” he says.In 1980, Montagnier recommended a series of precautions to be taken in the gathering and processing of the pituitary gland but was ignored. He says that the authorities should have halted the use of cadaver-derived human growth hormone when the first case of CJD was linked to the substance and detected in the United States. “This disaster could have been partly avoided,” Montagnier told Science. Montagnier said he was “surprised and saddened” by the court’s failure to attribute responsibility, and is also critical of the fact that since the scandal, there has been little research into technology that could detect early signs of CJD. But the French scientific community is split on whether today’s ruling was just. “No one committed a real fault or negligence,” says another witness, neurologist Yves Agid, who was formerly in charge of monitoring CJD cases in France and is scientific director at the Institute of Brain and Spinal Cord Disorders here. “At the time, no one could imagine that patients would contract CJD from human growth hormone.” The public prosecutor had demanded 4-year suspended sentences for the two main protagonists, pediatrician-endocrinologist Jean-Claude Job, who headed the defunct association in charge of collecting the hormone-containing pituitary glands from cadavers and who died after the trial ended, and Fernand Dray, who was in charge of purifying the material at the Pasteur Institute. Dray was also accused of corruption over purchases of human growth hormone from abroad, but the charges were dropped under the statute of limitations. The criminal court case had proceeded despite a dismissive 2005 report from the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM) that had concluded: “It is not reasonable to expect the players involved in the production of growth hormone to have guessed there was a possible risk of CJD from a treatment used since the 1960s” without a single incidence of disease. That report was prepared by an international group of experts including Stanley Prusiner, who won the Nobel Prize for his discovery of prions, and another prion expert, Paul Brown, formerly of the U.S. National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.In contrast to the INSERM report, in 2003 a French civil appeal court upheld an earlier court ruling that the Pasteur Institute was responsible for the 2001 death of 30-year-old Pascale Fachin from CJD contracted from contaminated human growth hormone administered in 1985 and imposed a fine of €322,000.The prosecutor of the criminal case that just ended has 10 days to appeal the ruling. The families of victims have no right of appeal, but they hope to meet Justice Minister Rachida Dati to elicit her support, according to Bernard Fau, a victims’ lawyer. The court did award civil damages to the families who hadn’t already accepted an indemnity from the state.last_img read more

A Not-So Stimulating U.K. Budget

first_imgThose hoping for a £1 billion stimulus windfall for United Kingdom science in today’s budget announcement were disappointed. Although there was no new money for research, the U.K. government sought to firm up its commitment to fighting climate change with an even more ambitious target for carbon dioxide reductions and new funding for green manufacturing and low-carbon energy. Ministers in the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills were rumoured last month to be lobbying for a science stimulus package along the lines of the President Barack Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Several big name scientists supported the idea in the press. But that dream was shattered today by budget delivered to Parliament by Chancellor Alistair Darling that put more emphasis on cuts and efficiency savings than stimulating the economy. The government’s green credentials were very much on show, however, with a new commitment to reduce carbon dioxide emissions 34% compared by 2020 to 1990 levels. To help achieve this the Chancellor promised £1 billion for low-carbon industries, £525 million for offshore wind projects, £435 million for energy efficiency, and £405 million to encourage low-carbon energy and advanced green manufacturing. That last pot will fund four pilot coal-fired power plants equipped with carbon capture and storage technology. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)These initiatives drew a mixture of responses, ranging from some calling the budget a welcome boost for the green economy, to others labeling it too little too late. Science commentators warned that if the United Kingdom is to make its mark in environmental technology, it needs robust science to underpin innovation. “It must be remembered … that scientific advances—in renewable energy research, in the digital industries that have spurred the communications revolution, and in other important future industries like biotechnology—require a healthy research base. We must continue investing in order to ensure that the U.K. has a healthy pipeline of scientifically trained individuals and to maintain and strengthen our leading position in research and its applications,” says Robert Kirby-Harris, chief executive of the Institute of Physics.The seven U.K. research councils—which distribute grants and fund large research infrastructures—managed to save  £106 million that could have been lost if they were subjected to the efficiency savings the Chancellor is enforcing elsewhere in the government. But this protected money, the budget documents state, must be reinvested “to support key areas of economic potential.” This, according to Nick Dusic, director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering, undermines the independence of the research councils. “There needs to be an urgent review of this decision as it completely destroys the idea the research councils operate at arm’s length from government. Rather than boosting investment in the research base, like our international competitors, the government has moved money around,” he says.last_img read more

Russian Expats Challenge Country’s Support of Science

first_imgLast Friday, in the leading Moscow business newspaper Vedomosti, a letter addressed to Russia’s president and its prime minister and signed by more than 100 Russian researchers who permanently work abroad complained of “the disastrous situation in the Russian basic research,” noting extremely low levels of funding and a continuing massive brain drain. “We certainly hope to draw the attention of the political leadership of the country to the dangers of neglecting fundamental science and education,” says Andrei Starinets, a physicist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom and an author of the letter. “It takes years before investments in fundamental science and education pay off. These issues therefore require strategic rather than tactical thinking.”The letter hasn’t drawn any official response so far, but Russian officials this week boasted about their support of science, particularly a new program to lure back 100 expat researchers to work at least 2 months a year in a Russian research institute or university. “The process of return of researchers to Russia will become avalanche-like in the nearest future,” said the minister of science and education Andrey Fursenko at the Second International Nanotechnology Forum which has just closed in Moscow.“The process has started,” Fursenko further claimed in an interview to a Moscow radio station, “and many of those who returned back noted that they have got much more up-to-date equipment than they had abroad.” At the nanotech forum, Russia’s President Dmitry Medvedev also spoke of the expat researchers. “It would be inexcusable for us to neglect such a treasure,” he declared. “Our task is to interest these people by offering them proper conditions to work in our country and proper projects.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Starinets and the other letter-signers also focused on how “proper projects” could help Russian science. In their letter, they suggested the country try to attract world-scale scientific projects, using as a concrete example the construction of the International Linear Collider. This high-energy particle collider, envisioned as a possible successor to the Large Hadron Collider,  would boost Russia’s research in many fields, including information science, biology, and materials science, they say. Russian researchers within the country haven’t all embraced the letter and its desire for big-science projects. “My attitude to this letter is quite reserved,” says Mikhail Gelfand, deputy director of the Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems. “I am confused with the demand to raise funding of the science. It is good, of course, but it would not give any result without radical reforms in science. But most of all, I’m confused with the suggestion to launch big projects, particularly to build in Russia a new generation collider. At the moment, such projects could only be harmful for Russia. They would drag away big money and will not give any result. I am afraid this could happen regardless of the good intentions of the letter authors and people who have signed [the letter].”Starinets notes that published letter is “open for signing only to Soviet/Russian scientists having permanent positions abroad to avoid any criticism that the undersigned want any preferences for themselves from the Russian government or have any other selfish interests.” He adds that colleagues inside Russia have not been silent: In September, hundreds of signatures were collected in an analogous appeal to the president by doctors of science inside the Russian Federation, including many prominent members of the Academy of Sciences”.last_img read more

Why Some Species Thrived When Dinos Died

first_imgWhen an asteroid or comet slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, most of our planet’s species were wiped out in a mass extinction—including entire groups such as the nonavian dinosaurs, marine reptiles such as mosasaurs, and their flying kin the pterosaurs. But not all ecosystems suffered equally, and the dramatic difference in survival rates between marine species and freshwater ones has been particularly puzzling. A new study weighs in on the long-standing riddle.According to some estimates, about three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth disappeared during the end-of-the-Cretaceous dino-killing impact. But marine ecosystems lost only about half of their species, and freshwater environments lost a mere 10% to 22%, says William Lewis, an aquatic ecologist at the University of Colorado, Boulder. For instance, only about 10% of the major groups of bony fish died out, but species from all six groups of turtles alive at the time—and from most if not all groups of amphibians—survived the impact. The disparity with marine ecosystems began to make sense, he notes, when researchers began thinking of the mass extinction as a one-two punch: the fiery aftermath of the extraterrestrial impact, followed by a “nuclear winter”-like cold spell triggered by the smoke, soot, and myriad other tiny particles flung high into the atmosphere.In the wake of the impact, creatures in marine and freshwater ecosystems experienced three particularly strong stresses: starvation brought about by the collapse of the food chain (and especially by the lack of photosynthesis), the reduction or loss of dissolved oxygen in the water, and low temperatures. But in many cases, species living in freshwater environments had advantages over sea creatures that bolstered their chances of survival, Lewis and his colleagues explain this month in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences. Not that the animals living in lakes and rivers escaped unscathed, Lewis says: “A lot of them died, too, it’s just that many species as a whole were able to persist until conditions returned to something near normal.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)For instance, researchers have previously estimated that sunlight couldn’t reach Earth’s surface for at least several months after the impact. For the many species that depend on plants and photosynthetic microorganisms at the base of the world’s food web, that was catastrophic. Based on body size and metabolic requirements, Lewis and his colleagues estimate that all creatures weighing less than 100 grams (or measuring less than 10 centimeters long) would have starved to death if postimpact darkness lasted between 3 and 6 months—unless, they emphasize, the organisms were also adapted to scavenge for a living or if they typically became dormant in cold, harsh conditions. (Many ancestors of today’s mammals are presumed to have survived the mass extinction because they lived in burrows and were somewhat protected from the firestorm and then the global cold spell following the impact.)Those are the same adaptations that enable creatures living in lakes and rivers at high latitudes to survive a normal winter, when the bodies of water freeze over and 24-hour darkness reigns for weeks or months at a time, Lewis says.With so many aquatic plants and animals dying en masse after the impact, decomposition would have robbed the water of much of its dissolved oxygen, Lewis says. Again, however, creatures in high-latitude freshwater ecosystems often experience such conditions each winter when ice blocks the exchange of oxygen from the overlying air. In contrast, conditions in marine ecosystems are typically steadier, so creatures living there haven’t evolved much tolerance for dramatic changes in temperature or oxygen levels—and hence those species died out at much higher rates.And finally, while global temperatures may have plummeted after the impact, some portions of freshwater ecosystems may have been somewhat insulated from change. That’s because many lakes and streams get substantial amounts of their water not from surface runoff but from groundwater seepage—water that typically enters the streams at a steady temperature year-round, Lewis says.The new paper is “an extremely thorough review of the issues and patterns of freshwater versus marine extinction patterns and mechanisms,” says Thomas Holtz Jr., a paleontologist at the University of Maryland, College Park. “It looks like the [team] tied together a disparate bunch of lines of evidence into a nicely coherent whole.”Scientists have long suggested many of the characteristics that helped freshwater creatures survive the dino-killing mass extinction, but Lewis says that the new paper is the first one to put all the pieces together.The team’s analysis “basically tells the story I’ve been telling my students for years,” Holtz says: While many species in the marine realm starved when the base of the food chain collapsed, he notes, the bottom-feeders there—as well as many species in freshwater ecosystems—were taking advantage of stored sources of nutrients such as nutrient-rich runoff from the land and previously accumulated organic material. In a sense, he says, they were “eating from the pantry,” so they suffered less severely.last_img read more